Menu

Georgetown

I had time for a short walkabout in Georgetown a couple of days ago. I admit, this isn’t a place I go often…not because I don’t like the area, but the distance is time consuming and…well…the people are a bit full of themselves. Not me, of course.  (I admit that some might call that judgmental. Okay, perhaps.) But here’s the deal, there is a huge sense of entitlement present. My parking place. My lane in traffic. My place on the sidewalk. My seat at the bar. It could be the same in Old Town. The press of the crowd probably exacerbates this human condition of entitlement. Old Town will have the same kinds of crowds when they are done with their new hotels and attractions.Shoutout to a fellow photographer, a master of lighting, Avi Bender. He has some spectacular shots from around the world. I especially like his Icelandic portfolio. Give him a visit!The C&O canal has always fascinated me. What’s also fascinated me is that there is no descriptive historic dimension of the canal…or the canal and Georgetown. Where is the local history displayed? Where are the tours of the canal? Where…..  Well, I don’t think there are any such displays or markers. The shot below is one of the locks, obviously in need of repair. The boat, “Geoergetown” is sitting at the left…on the dock!! Turns out that it’s a reproduction built in 1985 to look like a boat from a hundred years before. People used to board that boat, listen to a historic tour of the canal and the Georgetown…all while the boat was being drawn up the canal by a donkey!! But then the boat fell apart, no one wanted to pay for a new one and the rest is (unwritten) history.Georgetown LockA short walk away from the lock was this wonderful food truck. Obviously a Pho specialist, obviously an art lover (artist?), obviously different. From a distance the patterns are lost in the density of the art. As you get closer to the truck, the sheer volume of the embedded stories art is a bit overwhelming…busy. But then zoom in a little.  There’s a story, and another, and another, and another.PhoWheels

Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

I had time for a short walkabout in Georgetown a couple of days ago. I admit, this isn’t a place I go often…not because I don’t like the area, but the distance is time consuming and…well…the people are a bit full of themselves. Not me, of course.  (I admit that some might call that judgmental. Okay, perhaps.) But here’s the deal, there is a huge sense of entitlement present. My parking place. My lane in traffic. My place on the sidewalk. My seat at the bar. It could be the same in Old Town. The press of the crowd probably exacerbates this human condition of entitlement. Old Town will have the same kinds of crowds when they are done with their new hotels and attractions.Shoutout to a fellow photographer, a master of lighting, Avi Bender. He has some spectacular shots from around the world. I especially like his Icelandic portfolio. Give him a visit!The C&O canal has always fascinated me. What’s also fascinated me is that there is no descriptive historic dimension of the canal…or the canal and Georgetown. Where is the local history displayed? Where are the tours of the canal? Where…..  Well, I don’t think there are any such displays or markers. The shot below is one of the locks, obviously in need of repair. The boat, “Geoergetown” is sitting at the left…on the dock!! Turns out that it’s a reproduction built in 1985 to look like a boat from a hundred years before. People used to board that boat, listen to a historic tour of the canal and the Georgetown…all while the boat was being drawn up the canal by a donkey!! But then the boat fell apart, no one wanted to pay for a new one and the rest is (unwritten) history.Georgetown LockA short walk away from the lock was this wonderful food truck. Obviously a Pho specialist, obviously an art lover (artist?), obviously different. From a distance the patterns are lost in the density of the art. As you get closer to the truck, the sheer volume of the embedded stories art is a bit overwhelming…busy. But then zoom in a little.  There’s a story, and another, and another, and another.PhoWheels

Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

I had time for a short walkabout in Georgetown a couple of days ago. I admit, this isn’t a place I go often…not because I don’t like the area, but the distance is time consuming and…well…the people are a bit full of themselves. Not me, of course.  (I admit that some might call that judgmental. Okay, perhaps.) But here’s the deal, there is a huge sense of entitlement present. My parking place. My lane in traffic. My place on the sidewalk. My seat at the bar. It could be the same in Old Town. The press of the crowd probably exacerbates this human condition of entitlement. Old Town will have the same kinds of crowds when they are done with their new hotels and attractions.Shoutout to a fellow photographer, a master of lighting, Avi Bender. He has some spectacular shots from around the world. I especially like his Icelandic portfolio. Give him a visit!The C&O canal has always fascinated me. What’s also fascinated me is that there is no descriptive historic dimension of the canal…or the canal and Georgetown. Where is the local history displayed? Where are the tours of the canal? Where…..  Well, I don’t think there are any such displays or markers. The shot below is one of the locks, obviously in need of repair. The boat, “Geoergetown” is sitting at the left…on the dock!! Turns out that it’s a reproduction built in 1985 to look like a boat from a hundred years before. People used to board that boat, listen to a historic tour of the canal and the Georgetown…all while the boat was being drawn up the canal by a donkey!! But then the boat fell apart, no one wanted to pay for a new one and the rest is (unwritten) history.Georgetown LockA short walk away from the lock was this wonderful food truck. Obviously a Pho specialist, obviously an art lover (artist?), obviously different. From a distance the patterns are lost in the density of the art. As you get closer to the truck, the sheer volume of the embedded stories art is a bit overwhelming…busy. But then zoom in a little.  There’s a story, and another, and another, and another.PhoWheels

Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

Let's Get In Touch!

Ready to start your next project with us? That's great! Give us a call or send us an email and we will get back to you as soon as possible!

123-456-6789

feedback@creative.com